How to send your Freedom of Information request to many authorities at once

Right To Know makes it simple for you to request information from any public authority in Australia. Sometimes you might want to ask the same question but to lots of different public authorities at once. Right To Know can help you there too, with batch requests.

Batch requests let you write one request that gets sent to lots of authorities at once. This is really handy if you want the same document but from different authorities, like this request for the social media policy of different government departments:

Screenshot showing the page of the Social Media Policy batch request on Right To Know

If you have a request you’d like to make to many authorities at once then get in touch and we can enable batch requests for your account too.

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One Comment

  1. harry gordon
    Posted November 14, 2019 at 8:49 pm | Permalink

    Our RIght to Know is violated by the Media itself. Chief Editors, Directors of News, Press Council, ACMA, not the AFP or ASIO or Christian Porters. The recent Media Inquiry, by Senator Conroy was a disgraceful SHAM, discarding submissions from anyone, not associated with the Media. For full information read the content of the Link:

    http://www.sites.google.com/site/hywwrn/letters/ChristianPorter_FreePress_AFP.doc

    An example of the Media, suppressing information, that the Public has the Right to Know: In August 2018, I offered information to BOEING’s CEO, Dennis A. Muilenburg. The information, if acted on, would have prevented the two fatal crashes; Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air, killing about 200 or more people. The first letter to Mr Muilenburg is on the link:

    http://www.sites.google.com/site/hywwrn/letters/BOEING_737_MAX_8.doc

    I sent this information to the Media a few times, but needless to say, it was suppressed. There you are. The info was not supressed by the AFP, ASIO, Christian Porter, byt by the Media.

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